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Author Topic: Flash attack on your router  (Read 3780 times)
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bigc73542
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Date Registered:November 08, 2004, 09:00:15 AM
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« on: January 16, 2008, 12:23:00 AM »

Flash Attack Could Take Over Your Router
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the only really secure computer is unplugged

bigc

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Date Registered:December 30, 2004, 01:04:33 AM
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2008, 04:35:34 PM »

Your link died ( :rabbi: ) so I hope you don't mind if I post about this from another source,  PCWorld:

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Security researchers have released code showing how a pair of widely used technologies could be misused to take control of a victim's Web browsing experience.

The code, published over the weekend by researchers Adrian Pastor and Petko Petkov, exploits features in two technologies: The Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) protocol, which is used by many operating systems to make it easier for them to work with devices on a network; and Adobe Systems' Flash multimedia software.

By tricking a victim into viewing a malicious Flash file, an attacker could use UPnP to change the primary DNS (Domain Name System) server used by the router to find other computers on the Internet. This would give the attacker a virtually undetectable way to redirect the victim to fake Web sites. For example, a victim with a compromised router could be taken to the attacker's Web server, even if he typed Citibank.com directly into the Web browser navigation bar.

"The most malicious of all malicious things is to change the primary DNS server," the researchers wrote. "That will effectively turn the router and the network it controls into a zombie which the attacker can take advantage of whenever they feel like it."

Because so many routers support UPnP, the researchers believe that "ninety nine percent of home routers are vulnerable to this attack."

In fact, many other types of UPnP devices, such as printers, digital entertainment systems and cameras are also potentially at risk, they added in a Frequently Asked Questions Web page explaining their research.

Users could avoid this attack by turning UPnP off on their routers, where it is normally enabled by default, but this would cause a variety of popular applications, such as IM (instant-message) software, games and Skype, to break and require manual configuration on the router.

However, another security expert said that turning off UPnP would be overkill, considering that online criminals have not even begun using this attack.
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bigc73542
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« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2008, 11:31:52 AM »

I am glad you caught the dead link. Thanks for posting further info on this possible threat.

bigc
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bigc

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